MRS Rosy Surveys

  1. Name some roses that do well in your area.

    • Griffith Buck, Austins, shrubs, and of course the old garden roses. I think, with enough protection a good rosarian could grow ALMOST any of the popular roses in their Maine gardens. There are exceptions to every rule.
    • Explorer Series, such as John Cabot, William Baffin, and John Davis
    • John Cabot, William Baffin, Chianti, Europeana, Mary Rose, Lilac Rose. Can tell better in a couple of months, as it will be their first winter if they survived it. I feel pretty sure that the ones I mentioned are O.K. the other fifteen or twenty I will just have to wait and see.
    • William Baffin, John Cabot, Heritage, Fairy, Seafoam, Zephirine Drouhin, Cuthberg Grant, New Dawn, Fredrick Mistral, Prairie Harvest, and Knockout.
    • Old Garden
    • Zone 4 Roses
    • Compte de Chambard, Rose a’ Parfum de L’Hay, John Cabot, Duchess of Portland, Alex McKenzie.
    • The Fairy and Iceberg
    • David Austins
    • Last year I planted my first two roses: Yellow Goldilocks, ever-blooming floribunda and Proud Land, red, tea rose. The yellow Goldilocks did very well
    • John Davis, Henry Cabot, William Baffin. All do well with no work. Any rose will do well if one is willing to put the effort into it.
    • All of our rogosas and all the mini seem to have come through the winter in good health. John’s tea roses are beginning to bud. Raven is way ahead of all of the others, but too soon to make a call on the rest. Since we are so new to growing roses in Maine, we don’t have a lot of years of record-keeping to fall back on. Veteran’s Honor is looking disappointing and is one of my favorites 🙁 Brass Band didn’t live through its first winter and I loved that one, too.
    • Crimson Bouquet (GR), Solitaire (HT), Playboy (FL), Birde Dream (HT), Carefree Delight (SH), Nicole (FL), and Elina (HT).
    • Chuckles, The Fairy, Henrey Kelsey, Rosa Rubrifolia
      • John Cabot, William Baffin, John Davis, Cpt. Samuel Holland
      • David Austins: Heritage, Eglantyne
      • Moss Roses: William Lobb, Salet
      • New Dawn as a climber
    • Therese Bugnet, Morden Roses, most of the Austins, Buck roses (once established) Veteran’s Honor, Touch of Class, Joan Fontaine, Scentimental, New Dawn, Kiss of Desire, Jeanne le Joie, Fourth of July, Wm. Baffin, Hansa, OGRs, Nearly Wild. That is some of this year’s survivors.
  2. How often and with what do you fertilize through the season?

    • I have been using Magnum Grow, as the package directs.
    • Organic compost — May, June, July (once a month) need to know the kind of fertilizer. I know it should be 10-10-10
    • Organic compost — plant with and top dressing, Nutricote- coated time release fertilizer like Osmocote.
    • Once a month with seaweed and Miracle Grow
    • Schultz Rose Food, Cow manure compost
    • Every 2 weeks.
    • 10-10-10 once a month
    • As the mood hits and with horse manure
    • Once or twice only
    • Once a month starting in May and ending in August
    • Once a week
    • Miracle Grow, I fertilize as soon as I uncover. Again about July 1. Try to add phosphate about Sept. 1
    • Once per week with the Magnum Grow
    • Every week, Magnum Grow water soluable fertilizer (8-10-8)
    • have been quite variable. Cow manure in spring and fall, most years. Epsom Salts to encourage basal shoots (magnesium) most years. Bone Meal most years. Roses Alive from Gardens Alive or Rose Tone from the local nursery or Rose Food from specialty companies, two or three feedings each year. Liquified kelp, once sprayed as a foliar feeding, but usually poured at the base during mid growing season.
    • During the growing season I try to fertilize appr.every 2 weeks,alternating between liquid and ganules (liquid Miracle Gro for roses and others (Schultz) also fish emulsion. I start with epsom salt early in the season, fresh seaweed, banana peelings whenever I have them.
    • I have used many different fertilizers, from Magnum Grow, Miracle Grow for Roses, etc. This year I am using 10-10-10, once a month in May, June and July. All other fertilizers I use as directed on the package.
    • I intend to fertilize weekly while they are in containers and every 2 weeks when planted (although I am open to suggestions). So far I’ve used Schultz’s liquid and one application of plant tone. I’ve also sent away for a product called Messenger by Biosphere which is supposed to aid in pest/disease control and growth. It is a foliar spray.
  3. What insect problems do you have in your garden and what do you do about it? If you spray, what do you use?

    • I have some aphids, darned old Japanese beetles, and for the first time last year I had what I think are thrips. I do use chemical spray, I tried not to, but found that if you really want to get rid of the pest, you need to use some chemicals. I have several different products I use.
    • Japanese Beetles- hand pick and Aphids- spray with water
    • Japanese Beetles, useless to spray for them, just pick them off I guess….
    • Leaf Hoppers, Japanese Beetles
    • Japanese Beetles- catch and destroy no spray
    • Cane borers, rose scale, spider mites, and aphids. I seal the cut ends to keep out the Boers, oil spray for rose scale, cold-water spray for spider mites and a strong force of water to knock off the aphids. For other insects, alternate between diazonon, and malithion.
    • The damage from Janpaness Beetles in my garden is a major problem. I got rid of my Hansa bush because beetles were very attractive to the fragrance of it.
    • Mostly, Japanese Beetles, I pick them off and John dusts and sprays.
    • Do not have any problem with insects,spray with Isotox
    • I have aphids, thrips, Spider mites and Japanese Beetles. I do not spray with any insecticides. For the aphids, thrips and spider mites I buy lady beetles and lace wings most years, and rub off the heaviest infestations. For Japanese Beetles I have traps that I empty every two days. I also pick beetles off the plants each evening or whenever the temperature falls below 70F. Above 70, they will fly or quickly drop and they are much harder to pick. I drop them into soapy water and after they are dead, I flush them down the toilet. The traps tend to capture about 5 times the quantity that I pick by hand. I also apply beneficial nematodes in the spring (they feed on the grubs, but cannot overwinter in our climate). Japanese Beetles first appear in my area on June 26. It has been the same day for the past 5 years, so I think it is not weather related. I put out the traps a few days before that. My observations have led me to these conclusions: Japanese beetles emerge from the ground at about noon (10 AM – 1 PM) every day. If it is raining at that time, they will not emerge. If it is very warm, more will emerge. If it is the full moon more will emerge. The greatest number emerge on very warm full moon days. Japanese beetles fly around only when it is above 70 degrees F. They like white – will especially attack white flowers, sometimes cling to white shirts, are easier to catch in white buckets. If it is under 70 F you can put down a white sheet and shake beetles from trees and bushes. They will fall straight down.
    • Lots of Aphids which I spray with water.Also Leafhoppers which I have to battle with spray this Year. However the biggest Pest are the Japanese Beetles which I killed by the thousands in previous Years. I use very hot soapy Water in a small bucket and drop them in killing them immediately rather than letting them suffer in kerosene or the controversial bags.I have to do this 3 times daily .
    • I have had aphids, mites, and of course the ever present Japanese Beetles from July until ? . I have several brands of insecticide which I try not to use unless I have to, but I have Daconil, Isotox, Malathion, and Ultra Fine Spray.
    • So far I have had aphids on one shrub rose called “Circus” and I sprayed it with an insecticide, name I don’t have right now. Normally would just use a spray mix of water and liquid dish soap. Have had a problem with Japanese beetles in the past that I treated with the soap spray only.
  4. How many hours per day/week you spend in your garden during growing season?

    • About 20-30 hours a week I would say has been my average in the past, which will change when we move. I did not have the insect problem in the old house, plus I had the lights from two businesses to allow me to work outside until 10 pm on a lot of nights.
    • 4 hours, sometimes more
    • Two to four hours a day
    • 2-4 hours
    • 2-3 hours per week
    • 8-10
    • 3 hours
    • Several
    • 3 hours per day
    • 2-10 hours a week
    • 20 minutes/day
    • 4 hours a day
    • Not as many as I’d like to, as I work during the day, but my minis require minimal work. John is retired and will have more time to tend his tea roses. So I may be out for an hour a couple of days during the week and then on Saturdays working with the roses and perennials.
    • Average 6-8 hrs/week
    • No idea.
    • I don’t know how many hours I spent in the Gardens since it is basically just me doing the work.
    • I spend every minute I can in the garden, which roughly is 2-3 hours weekdays, and just about all day Sat. and Sun. We are still building our gardens.
    • In a good week I spend 10-15 hours in my gardens. During a rainy or hectic week it is more like 2-3.
  5. What kind of workshops would you like to have in the future?

    • This is a hard one. I would appreciate any extra info. You never can know it all, there is always a need to learn more and better methods in gardening. One thing I really would like to have more help on is garden design. I do not have the artist’s eye. I need to see or have ideas to get started.
    • Consulting rosarian workshop, rose exhibit, members’ rose garden sharing, grow better roses
    • More about the care of roses, and pruning them in the spring
    • ARS consulting rosarian workshop-whether official or not-or parts thereof, including pesticide/fungicide workshop.
    • Miniature roses
    • Cultivation care, garden preparation, new roses (modern shrubs)
    • Photography
    • Since I am a new gardener, I would like some very basic “how to”. For instance, it will be very helpful if someone would show me how to actually prune roses. I read some books and materials but it is not the same as someone giving demonstrations.
    • I will be very happy to see more sharing on our own member gardens with slides or digital presentation. I believe we all have a lot to share in regard to our own experience in growing roses.
    • It could well be that I am the only one who is interested in propagating roses. It is a great feeling to get a cutting or a seed to grow. I find it lots of fun anticipating what your seedling will look like, every one is different.
    • I have enjoyed each of the workshops that I have been able to attend. I like to make arrangements for the house but just “wing it”. Maybe a workshop on arrangements and what other flowers to include to compliment the roses…. At one workshop I attended, the speaker touched on companion planting for roses, maybe someone could expand on that theme.
    • Exhibiting roses
    • Workshops…….hmmmmmmmm……
      • Hands on proper pruning /planting ….everyone bring a bareroot Rose or the society could order some for us i.e.Hortico.It is always BETTER to do it than to write it down.
      • starting Roses with Cuttings – again Hands on
      • Pest Control is always neccessary…..
      • some unusual Ideas to match Roses/Perennials. Timetable for Maine when particular perrennials bloom in conjuction with roses. Perhaps swapping perrennials i.e. daylillies etc.the same day ?
      • BUT for more Fun……going to the Elisabeth Rose Garden in Conn.
    • Gee, this is a hard one. I think anything you can learn, or refresh on is great. We have not had much on planning a garden using roses and other companion plants, designing ideas.
    • I would enjoy workshops on wintering roses out of doors, growing miniatures, propagating and pruning. Also a workshop on arranging would be fun.
  6. If you were isolated on an island, which single rose cultivar would you take with you?

    • Oh, WOW!! That could change weekly. My problem is that I love them all. I would try to take one that is mildew resistant, islands are humid I think. MAYBE I would take Pure Poetry, she is mildew resistant, has a lovely flower-color and form. Or maybe Pierre de Ronsard, that is a LOVELY rose, very disease resistant, and a lot of gorgeous huge blooms, but then maybe I would take my favorite at the moment, it changes quite often.
    • Felicite Parmentier
    • That is very difficult, can’t answer right now
    • Ideal, Repeat blooming, double blooms, pink, strong grower, fragrant, climber, not susceptible to black spot. Perhaps Gloire de Dijon- zone 5-6, is my island warm?
    • Carefree Beauty
    • David Austin- But if only one rose, my father’s rose- an old rugosa
    • Sharon Rose without a doubt.
    • Marilyn Monroe
    • I would probably take a plant I could eat, so a raspberry bush or peach tree – both rose relatives.
    • WHAT only 1 ? hahaha…..Louise Odier or David Austin’s Eglantyne
    • Is this a warm island or a cold island? When you love all roses this is a toughie. Pure Poetry or maybe Eden. (today that is, tomorrow might be a different answer!)
    • Rose of a desert island – Levanne (sp?), for its beautiful lavender color and powerful scent.
  7. What questions you will ask the members in our next survey?

    • There are so many things to learn from other’s experiences, any question thrown into a hat to be answered by a group would just have to bring a learning experience.
    • How do we encourage members to participate in meetings more? What kinds of service MRS can provide? How do we combine activities of two rose societies in Maine?
    • What discussion topics should we have at meetings?
    • How can we all help out with the newsletter, web site, and activites without burdening a few members? I think they are just wonderful. We have a very nice organization with those members who are dedicated to their commitments.
    • This year John and I covered his tea roses with tarps that we formerly used to put over or dog kennels in the summertime. They are designed to let the rain/wind flow through while keeping out 80% of the sun’s rays. During the winter, they allowed the rain/melted snow to flow down and kept much of the wind off the roses while still allowing ventilation. This winter was not a good test for winter conditions because it was mild, but the roses look much nicer than last year. The one thing we neglected was to provide enough support from underneath, as the weight of the snow broke a few of the stems.
    • What should the Rose Society be doing?
    • WHY Roses ?
    • What roses do you loose every winter? What roses seem to survive for you in ANY type of winter? What is your favorite rose, and why?
    • Examples of unique trellises for climbers and helpful hints for growing them and which cultivars to choose.
  8. WHY Roses?

    • He does not promise me a rose garden but gives me a rose garden.
    • I started with a perennial bed and a person from the MRS asked “Have you ever thought of growing roses”? Immediately I went right out and bought Ambridge. That was the beginning in July 2000, also joined the MRS. From then on it became addictive and I now have fifty- one roses of all different kinds. They keep me busy, active and happy from spring until October. I have roses because they are beautiful and my favorite flower. This spring I will be planting my first two hybrid tea cuttings, Love & Peace, and St. Patrick that I started October 22nd under lights then there will be fifty -three.
    • Roses are the queen of flowers throughout history. Politics: The War of the Roses. Poetry: “A rose by any other name. .” Fairy Tales: Rose Red. If I was better informed, I bet I could go on all day.
      • There are thousands and thousands of rose varieties. So many, I don’t think anyone knows how many.
      • Roses are elegant. The War of the Roses makes sense to us. The War of the daisies would not.
      • Roses are cherished and their cousins are cherished plants – cherry trees, raspberry bushes, blackberry bushes, apple trees. These are all close relatives of the rose.
    • The rose is the most recognized flower in the world. It is just like any other hobby or topic that interests someone. You could describe it as; whatever tickles your fance, whatever blows your dress up, etc.
    • Why Roses, huh? Because of their beauty, fragrance, variety of form, and yes, also the challenge.
    • I love their smell, perfection of color and the soft velvet feel of the petals. Although they “bite” every thorn I’ve had stuck in my hand or arm has been worth it – almost like they are talking to me. I also have an ego and like being able to grow something most people think is so difficult.